生活史的風景

I started taking pictures of my own laundry (it should be noted that these are my own personal items). While I was restricted from going out due to the Corona disaster and unable to find a specific subject, I came across Ken Domon’s phrase “life-historical landscape,” and I began to pay more attention than before to narrow, ordinary, overlooked scenes in my life, motifs that I would not notice until they were photographed.

Washing clothes is a household chore that I take for granted every day, but doing it on a sunny day feels like a special act to me. The moment when I feel the sunlight and wind is pleasant, and the clothes seem to accumulate the passage of time of the day.

Despite being a private existence strongly connected to the lifestyle of an individual or a house, laundry, which is sometimes hung outside to dry and exposed to the public eye, is like a filter that drifts between the private and public spaces.

Also, the presence of someone who washes the clothes, hangs them out to dry, and will come back to pick them up in the near future is felt in the laundry. Even after being exposed to wind and rain. The laundry is there as a trace of someone’s life. I am fascinated by the resilience of human life that laundry evokes, and I continue to photograph it.

In his book “To Die and To Live,” Ken Domon presented the term and concept of “life-historical landscape. The term is used in one of his works titled “Landscape Photography.

By the way, these are picture-postcard landscape photographs, but the salon-like landscape photographs taken up to now are without the artist himself. I think this is the most distinctive feature. The person is not there, and you cannot feel the presence of the photographer. (Therefore, no matter who takes the pictures, they will always look similar. Even if you use different filters, there is not much difference. There is no room for compensatory conditions. However, there is what I often refer to as a life-history landscape, a narrow landscape, even within the same landscape. There are landscapes with ordinary motifs that are noticed only after they are photographed, and until then, no one would notice them. The artist’s eye is focused on this, and through camera position, camera angle, and shutter chance, it is possible to create something that strongly appeals to the viewer as a photograph.

Dying and Living 1974 p256

A glimpse of the photographer’s eye in a life-historical landscape. The extraordinary of being ordinary.

Let me try to capture what Domon means by “life-historical landscape” in my own way.

To add a supplemental note to the possibility of misunderstanding that may arise by cutting out a part of Domon’s statement, Domon does not deny taking photographs of landscapes.

After all, unless one’s own subjective, human impulse or emotion is added, taking a picture of a landscape is simply a picture postcard. From the standpoint of looking at our own peoples and landscapes, we must once again clearly add our own interpretation.

Living and Dying 1974 p259

At that time, the camera household penetration rate was over 70%. Domon also says that as a result of the development of equipment and the spread of modern cameras, the photographic world is in a slump, deprived of the wonder, anticipation, and sense of self-satisfaction that comes with taking a picture.

Photographers have been reduced to clicking the shutter in a state of idle amusement. Domon’s lament may still resonate today, or perhaps even more so.

Domon’s concept of “self-interpretation = the photographer’s own home” is not limited to landscapes, but was one of Domon’s philosophies for photographing all kinds of motifs.

It means that there is a person who is clearly gazing at the scene. It is not just a matter of capturing the appearance of clouds, but also of having a person who is staring at the appearance of the clouds. The salon-style landscape photography of the past has never drawn the viewer’s attention to the scenery. They are simply admiring and leaning against the landscape. This is true not only for landscapes, but for all motifs. Photographs that only show the finishing touches, like the landscapes of salon photography, are already not the photographs of today.

Living and Dying 1974 p260

Rather than emphasizing the novelty and originality of the motif, it is about how the viewer can relate to even a common motif as if it were his or her own. A good photograph is one that suggests this motive to the viewer.

Let us try to decipher the motif of “laundry” from a different perspective.

All photography is reminiscent of death (memento mori). To take a photograph is to enter into the mortality, transience, and impermanence of another’s (or an object’s) life. By slicing and freezing this very moment, every photograph bears witness to the relentless dissolution of time.

Theory of Photography – Susan Sontag 1979 p23

At the recent “Memento Mori and Photography” exhibition at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, there was a related piece on “death” implied by photography, along with this passage from Sontag. This commentary seems to be an accepted theory about photography. But is it really so? I feel uncomfortable with the theory of photography presented by Sontag and attempt a small resistance to it.

The motifs cut out of photographs do not imply the future. I sympathize with some of Sontag’s statements. The nostalgia we feel from the photographs may be correlated with the “death” that the photographs evoke.

Imagine, for example, a chair in a room, not a person, as a motif. When I see the chair, I feel that it has been left behind in the past. I can recall someone who used to sit in that chair, but I cannot picture someone who comes to sit there. The chair is there as a trace of something.

On the other hand, “laundry. When we see laundry, we feel the presence of someone who washed the clothes, hung them out to dry, and will come to take them in in the near future. Even after being exposed to the wind and rain.

The laundry is there as a trace of someone’s life.

In other words, I am fascinated by the resilience and strength of human life that laundry reminds me of, as if to describe it as a future left out in the open.

自分の洗濯物の写真を撮るようになった(あくまでも私個人の物であることは明記しておく)。コロナ禍で外出が制限され、被写体が定まらない中で土門拳の「生活史的風景」という言葉に出会い、生活の中でごく平凡で見過ごされる狭い風景、写真に撮られてはじめて気がつくようなモチーフに以前よりも目を向けるようになった。

洗濯は日々当たり前に行う家事ではあるが、晴れの日に行うそれは私にとって特別な行為に感じられる。陽の光と風を感じる瞬間は心地よく、衣類にはその日一日の時間の経過が蓄積されているように思える。

個人や家の生活様式に強く結びついた私的な存在であるにも関わらず、外に干されて人目にさらされることもある洗濯物は、私的な空間と公的な空間との間に漂うフィルターのようでもある。

また、洗濯物には、その衣類を洗い、干して、そして近い未来に取りこみにくる誰かの存在が感じられる。風雨にさらされてなお。誰かが生きている軌跡としてそこに洗濯物はある。言うなれば野ざらしの未来とでも形容するような、洗濯物が連想させる人間の生活のたくましさに私は魅了されて撮り続けている。

土門拳は著作『死ぬことと生きること』の中で「生活史的風景」という言葉と概念を提示した。「風景写真」と題された一編にその言葉が使われている。

ところで、絵はがき的な風景写真であるが、今までのサロン的な風景写真は本人不在である。これが一番の特徴ではないかと思う。そこに人が感ぜられない。(中略)従って、誰が撮っても似たような写真しかできない。フィルターをかえて使うといっても、大してちがいも出てこない。補正的な条件が働く余地がない。ところが、同じ風景でも、ぼくがよく言う生活史的な風景という、いわゆる狭い風景がある。写真に撮られて初めて気がつくような、それまでは誰も気がつかないような平凡なモチーフの風景がある。そこに作者の目がするどく向けられて、カメラ・ポジション、カメラ・アングル、シャッター・チャンスによってそれが写真として強く人に訴えるものができる。

死ぬことと生きること 1974 p256

生活史的風景に垣間見る撮影者の視線。平凡であることの非凡さ。

土門が言う生活史的な風景というものを私なりに捉えてみる。

土門の発言の一部を切り取ることで誤解が生じる可能性があるため補足をすると、土門は風景を撮ることを否定しているわけではない。

結局、自分の主体的な、人間的な撮影衝動、エモーションというものが加わらないかぎりは、風景を撮ってもそれは単に絵はがきである。われわれの民族、風土を見る立場としては、もう一回はっきりと自分の解釈というものをそこに付け加えなければならない。

生きることと死ぬこと 1974 p259

当時のカメラ世帯普及率は70%を越えていた。機材が発達し近代化されたカメラが普及した結果、写真が写るということの驚異・期待・自己満足感が奪われ、写真界は不振に陥っているとも土門は言っている。

撮影者は漫然とシャッターを切るだけになってしまった。この土門の嘆きは現代においてもなお、あるいはより一層響くのではないか。

また、「自己解釈=本人在宅」という考え方は何も風景に限った話ではなく、あらゆるモチーフに対する土門の撮影理念の一つだった。

そこに、はっきりと見つめている人間がいるということである。雲のたたずまいを写すということだけでなく、その雲のたたずまいにじっと見入っている人間がいるということである。今までのサロン的な風景写真は、決して風景を引張っていない。ただ詠嘆し、寄りかかっているだけである。これは風景ばかりでなく、あらゆるモチーフについて言えることであるが、本人不在の写真はつまらない。今までのサロン写真の風景のように、ただ仕上げだけで見せる写真は、すでに今日の写真ではない。

生きることと死ぬこと 1974 p260

モチーフの新規性、独自性を強調するのではなく、ありきたりなモチーフであっても如何に自分ごととして関われるか。その動機が鑑賞者に暗示されるようなものが良い写真である、とも言えるのではないか。

異なる観点から「洗濯物」というモチーフを読み解いてみる。

写真はすべて死を連想させるもの(メメント・モリ)である。写真を撮ることは他人の(あるいは物の)死の運命、はかなさや無常に参入するということである。まさにこの瞬間を薄切りにして凍らせることによって、すべての写真は時間の容赦ない溶解を証言しているのである。

写真論 – スーザン・ソンタグ 1979 p23

先日、東京都写真美術館で開催されていた「メメント・モリと写真」展にて、ソンタグのこの一節と共に写真が暗示する「死」について関連のある作品が展示されていた。この評論は写真についての定説として受け入れられているもの、と思われる。だが果たして本当にそうか。ソンタグが提示した写真論に対する違和感と、ささやかな抵抗を試みる。

写真に切り取られたモチーフが未来を暗示することはない。ソンタグの発言に共感するところもある。写真から受け取る郷愁(ノスタルジー)は写真が連想させる「死」と相関があるだろう。

モチーフとして「人」ではなく例えば、部屋に置かれた一脚の「椅子」を想像してみる。その椅子を見た時に私は「この椅子は過去に取り残されている」と感じる。その椅子にかつて座っていた誰かは想起されるが、そこに座りに来る誰かは思い描けない。何かの痕跡としてそこに椅子はある。

一方で「洗濯物」。洗濯物を見た時には、その衣類を洗い、干して、そして近い未来に取り込みに来る誰かの存在が感じられる。風雨にさらされてなお。

誰かが生きている軌跡としてそこに洗濯物はある。

言うなれば、野ざらしの未来とでも形容するような、洗濯物が連想させる人間の生活の逞しさ、力強さに魅了されている。